Sport Climbing Tips: Picking Out Your Projects

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Do you love to project hard routes as much as I do?

If your answer is, “Heck no, I just climb for fun/exercise/recreation and get on whatever,” then this article is not for you!

However, if you love to project routes (i.e. give multiple attempts on routes until you redpoint them…or not, as the case may be!), or you want to give projecting a shot, read on.

As a longtime project climber, I have found that the following approaches work best for me:

  1. Sample what is out there before you settle on your project(s). Even on a super-short trip, getting on more than one route will give you more of a taste of what an area has to offer. Of course, if the first potential project you try is the most awesome climb you’ve ever tried…well, go ahead and stick with it if it makes you happy. I still usually like to try a few routes before I project anything, though – that’s just my preference.
  2. I think it’s good to have more than one project at a time. I like having a number of projects going that involve different styles, skills, and difficulty levels. I usually have shorter-term, easier projects (routes I know I can do fairly quickly), and I save those for the days when I don’t feel super awesome, actually. This works for me, because I want to put my full-energy, best days into my dream projects, the routes that push me and that I’m not sure I can ever send. I climb to push my limits more than anything, so I enjoy having one or two long-term projects like this.
  3. Having more than one project at a time keeps boredom at bay and helps me avoid repetitive use injuries, too. It also helps me avoid stagnating/plateauing on any given project (mentally and physically). Having just one project can lead a person to develop the skills and strengths for that route and that route alone, and then when they get on something else of a similar difficulty, even in a similar style, they might find themselves stymied. Keeping diversity in the projecting can help keep this from happening.
  4. About those “dream projects:” I think these are a great idea so long as you don’t get frustrated or pissed or put expectations on yourself about when you “should” send them by. For a dream project to work for me, I must absolutely love the climb from start to finish. No moves that I loathe or dread – even the hard moves are amazing and fun. Because we’re going to have such a long relationship, I feel that it’s important to love a project like this. A dream project pushes me harder than the projects I can send in a reasonable amount of time. Dream projects make me a better climber; they also teach patience and perseverance. Progress is measured in small ways, and this can become a beautiful process of learning, patience, and self-discovery.
  5. I always try to include a project or two, dream project or no, that really test and work my weak links – providing me with a steady stream of stimuli to try to improve those areas every time I get on those routes. I also always try to include a project or two that cater more to my strengths – because it’s fun to feel strong and to climb to your strengths.
  6. I don’t feel obligated to stick with a project if I start to get bored with it or don’t like it or something else captures my attention more. Climbing is supposed to be fun (right?), so if a project is not enjoyable for you to try anymore, you might want to take a break – maybe just for a few days or weeks, or maybe forever.
  7. I do what I feel like on any given day of climbing, and it’s totally my choice. Above all, never forget that it’s up to you; it’s your climbing. You do it for you and for nobody else. Do what you like!
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