Category Archives: Climbing Training

Improve Your Sport Climbing (16): Nutrition and Body Composition, Part 5 (HARD)

 

Image courtesy of iosphere/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of iosphere/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Today’s entry discusses the topic of alcohol as it relates to athletic performance and recovery, as covered in my recent interview with Dr. Dan Benardot, leading nutrition expert and author of “Advanced Sports Nutrition-2nd Edition.”

Q: What are the effects of alcohol on athletic performance?

A: The data are incredibly clear. Alcoholic beverages specifically impact reaction time for up to five days and for at least three days after consumption. And yet consumption of often quite large quantities of alcohol post-competition or post-exertion is prevalent in virtually all sports. The pressure of performance is high, and athletes turn to alcohol after to relieve this pressure. However, it can take up to a week to recover from this type of consumption. This is the problem with acute alcohol intake.

There’s also a problem with a chronic consumption of alcohol at not such a high intake. Alcohol is an anti-nutrient. It inhibits the production of a number of B-vitamin coenzymes that are required for nutrients to be absorbed, so you can get de facto vitamin deficiencies even in the presence of those vitamins because alcohol blocks the coenzyme production. This is just one way that alcohol interferes with the body’s use of nutrients. Another example of interference happens with retinol, the precursor to vitamin A. [For more on this, read Alcohol, Vitamin A, and Beta-Carotene: Adverse Interactions, Including Hepatotoxicity and Carcinogenicity.]

I understand if you’re not an athlete having a drink in the evening to relax. And in fact, there are a couple of new studies out looking at beer consumption as a post-activity replenishment beverage. As a post-exercise replenishment, a moderate amount of beer may not be bad if you’re not going to exercise again in the next few days or do another sporting event for a month. The relaxing effect of alcohol is valid, and it can potentially help you remove metabolic by-products more efficiently – but only if you’re not exercising or participating in an event for a long period of time afterwards.

Alcohol works against athletic performance both acutely and chronically. The bottom line is that if you’re actively involved in athleticism, lay low. In other words, if you want to drink alcohol, drink. If you want to be an athlete, be an athlete.

(For more on the potential effects of alcohol consumption on athletic performance and recovery, read ESPN.com Special Section on Drugs & Sports: Alcohol; Alcohol: Impact on Sports Performance and Recovery in Male Athletes; and What I Do and the Science Behind It (9): Alcohol.)

14

This multipart series of articles starts here, in case you have to catch up – you’ll also find a full table of contents, complete with links, in that entry. My designation of each area as “easy,” “medium” or “hard” is purely subjective. I’ve arrived at the designations from my personal experience garnered from 20+ years of climbing along with observations I’ve made as a climbing coach/certified personal trainer. You may find some of the areas harder or easier to change. You also might not agree with me or my take on things. That’s fine – feel free to take it or leave it as you wish! Also, remember that the information I provide here is purely offered as advice and that no exercises or training program should be undertaken without receiving medical clearance from a healthcare professional.

One other caveat: As will be true for all of the entries and articles in this series, if you’ve already mastered or maxed out the topic at hand to the best of your ability level, you’ll reap far fewer benefits or none at all from my suggestions – good for you that you figured it out, but sorry I couldn’t help you out more. Happy climbing and training!

Improve Your Sport Climbing (16): Nutrition and Body Composition, Part 4 (HARD)

Image courtesy of Raktim Chatterjee/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Raktim Chatterjee/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“[A]thletes should work as intensely as possible within a given time frame to increase fat loss and optimize body composition.” (Dr. Dan Benardot, “Advanced Sports Nutrition-2nd Edition“)

Today’s entry continues the previous entry’s discussion about working toward optimizing body composition (strength-to-weight ratio), as covered in my recent interview with Dr. Dan Benardot, leading nutrition expert and author of “Advanced Sports Nutrition-2nd Edition.”

Q: What is the best way to lose fat and sustain or gain sport-specific lean muscle mass?

A: There are a couple of physiological realities that people don’t generally understand too well. First of all, genetically, we’re coming from a place where calories were hard to come by. Our bodies are always trying to become more energy efficient. And, we are amazingly good fat storers. We have remarkable ways to store fat!

Secondly, if you lift weights [or train] with regularity, your body will be forced to make an energy-efficient adaptation. Once that adaptation – with larger, stronger muscles and a more efficient cardiovascular system – occurs, the adaptation to activity is associated with a lower caloric requirement than you had when you started the activity.

In other words, you need to constantly ramp up the activity’s intensity to maintain caloric burn and to push for greater adaptations. And, while it may take you weeks to become extremely efficient at a certain level of physical work, if you stop doing it for some time or don’t continue to increase your intensity, the body will try to go back to baseline.

There’s also a common misunderstanding of proportion and volume when discussing activities for fat loss. Doing a low-intensity aerobic activity to burn 100 calories, let’s say that 80 percent of those calories come from fat, so 80 calories are burned from fat stores. Double the intensity of that exercise so that you’re burning 200 calories in much less time, and the fat-burn proportion has gone down to 60 percent – but you’re still burning 120 calories from fat. People chronically confuse proportion with volume, and this has led to the erroneous idea that relatively low-intensity aerobic activity is the best way to lose fat or is necessary for fat loss. It’s not. [For more on this, check out “High or Low Intensity Exercise - Which Is Best For Weight Loss” on ShapeFit.com.]

Summing it up, these two things – our bodies’ ability to store fat and our propensity toward energy efficiency – make an athlete’s life difficult. Athletes need to focus on getting calories in regularly in relatively small doses in order to sustain muscle mass and keep body fat levels desirably low, as well as engaging in sport-appropriate training programs that continuously challenge the body in new, more intense, ways.

10

This multipart series of articles starts here, in case you have to catch up – you’ll also find a full table of contents, complete with links, in that entry. My designation of each area as “easy,” “medium” or “hard” is purely subjective. I’ve arrived at the designations from my personal experience garnered from 20+ years of climbing along with observations I’ve made as a climbing coach/certified personal trainer. You may find some of the areas harder or easier to change. You also might not agree with me or my take on things. That’s fine – feel free to take it or leave it as you wish! Also, remember that the information I provide here is purely offered as advice and that no exercises or training program should be undertaken without receiving medical clearance from a healthcare professional.

One other caveat: As will be true for all of the entries and articles in this series, if you’ve already mastered or maxed out the topic at hand to the best of your ability level, you’ll reap far fewer benefits or none at all from my suggestions – good for you that you figured it out, but sorry I couldn’t help you out more. Happy climbing and training!

Move of the Month 2: Straight-Arming Your Rests (Improve Your Climbing Series)

Kevin taking advantage of a great rest by lowering his body weight, bending his knees, and straightening his arms, allowing him to relax and shake out while looking ahead at what's coming up.

Kevin taking advantage of a great rest by lowering his body weight, bending his knees, and straightening his arms, allowing him to relax and shake out while looking ahead at what’s coming up.

This month’s move is a simple one, yet one that often goes under-utilized by climbers: straightening your arms at rests while you’re climbing. It’s a very common tendency for climbers to “rest” with their arms quite bent and with rod-straight legs – especially on slightly less-than-vertical to vertical to slightly overhanging terrain. The more overhanging terrain becomes, the harder it becomes to get away with feeling like you’re truly resting while keeping your arms bent. In other words, super-steep climbing tends to force the issue a bit more, resulting in straighter arms on rests or quicker, more obvious failure from not using rests as efficiently as possible.

Instead of keeping the arms in a powerful, bent, locked-off position during a true on-route rest — a place where you’re still climbing (not hanging), but you can shake out both hands alternately — try to lower your body weight down so that your legs are bent and your arms are as straight as possible.

At the same resting spot pictured in the first photo, here Kevin shows how he can miss out on this rest by keeping his arms bent and his legs straight while looking ahead.

At the same resting spot pictured in the first photo, here Kevin shows how he can miss out on this rest by keeping his arms bent and his legs straight while looking ahead.

The next time you find yourself on a set of handholds that feel good enough for you to take a rest and shake out each hand alternately on a route, experiment by lowering your body weight down on the holds until your arms are straight. Try to make this a habit in your climbing, looking for ways to straighten your arms and alternating which hand you can let go with while keeping the opposite arm as straight as possible. Sometimes this requires a shift in foot positions in order to find the most efficient rest for each arm.

Be careful about not taking the rest to its full advantage, too. What do I mean by this? As shown in the photo below, this most commonly happens when you straighten your arms but fail to bend your legs. In this type of position, you get somewhat of a rest, but not the fullest rest you could potentially get from a great resting spot like this. It takes more energy to lean back like this and keep your legs straight rather than bending your legs and letting your body weight sink down. It’s also way harder to shake out while leaning back like this.

IMG_8376

There will certainly be times when you take a much-needed (often very quick!) rest (a “quick shake”) while climbing when you will not be able to find a straight-armed position, or when you’ll only be able to shake one hand and not the other.  And, you will sometimes need to pull up out of a rest to feel out or get a visual of what’s ahead, particularly when you’re onsighting and you can’t see clearly what might be coming up from your most efficient resting position. However, it’s a good idea to make it a habit of trying to find the most straight-armed, least-fatiguing positions possible when you rest on your warm-ups, onsight efforts and projects — so long as amazing no-hands rests aren’t available, of course.

Recovering by resting efficiently while climbing is a key tactic that can make or break your send of a route, and strategically managing your rests to be as effective as possible can help you achieve this end. Finding resting positions that require the least amount of energy and that are the most truly restful positions for you is a major way to make the most of your on-route resting, and seeking straight-armed positions in which you can lower your body weight so that you’re hanging down (not out) by bending your knees usually supports this effort, allowing you much more ease in shaking out each arm in turn as you rest and contemplate what’s ahead.

This multipart series of articles starts here, in case you have to catch up – you’ll also find a full table of contents, complete with links, in that entry. My designation of each area as “easy,” “medium” or “hard” is purely subjective. I’ve arrived at the designations from my personal experience garnered from 20+ years of climbing along with observations I’ve made as a climbing coach/certified personal trainer. You may find some of the areas harder or easier to change. You also might not agree with me or my take on things. That’s fine – feel free to take it or leave it as you wish! Also, remember that the information I provide here is purely offered as advice and that no exercises or training program should be undertaken without receiving medical clearance from a healthcare professional.

One other caveat: As will be true for all of the entries and articles in this series, if you’ve already mastered or maxed out the topic at hand to the best of your ability level, you’ll reap far fewer benefits or none at all from my suggestions – good for you that you figured it out, but sorry I couldn’t help you out more. Happy climbing and training!