Category Archives: Yoga

Ten Sleep/Worland 2017 Yoga Class Schedule

Image courtesy of digitalart at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of digitalart at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017 Ten Sleep/Worland Yoga Class Schedule

Ten Sleep Yoga Classes: Monday Evenings

Session 1: Feb. 6, 13, 27, March 6, 13, 20, 27, April 3
Session 2: April 10, 24, May 1, 8, 15, 22, June 5, 12
Session 3: June 19, 26, July 10, 17 (half-session)
Session 4: Aug. 7, 14, 21, 28, Sept. 11, 18, 25, Oct. 2
Session 5: Oct. 30, Nov. 6, 13, 20, 27, Dec. 4, 11, 18

NOTE: Please bring your own yoga mat to yoga classes in Ten Sleep; no mats will be provided. Classes take place at the new Ten Sleep Fitness Center, where the after-school club used to be located (one block south of the school). Find class descriptions below.

Vinyasa Slow: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Vinyasa Flow Combined I & II: 5:45 to 6:45 p.m.

Drop-in fee is $8 per class; email me for details on multi-class pricing options.

Worland Yoga Classes: Wednesday Evenings

Session 1: Feb. 8, 15, 22, March 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
Session 2: April 5, 12, 26, May 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
Session 3: June 7, 14, 21, 28, July 12, 19 (six-week session)
Session 4: Aug. 9, 16, 23, 30, Sept. 13, 20, 27, Oct. 4
Session 5: Oct. 25, Nov. 1, 8, 15, 22, Dec. 6, 13, 20

Vinyasa Slow: 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Worland Health Club (WHC) studio.

Vinyasa Flow Combined I & II: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the WHC studio.

Stretch & Refresh: 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. at the WHC studio.

Drop-in fee is $8 per class at WHC; email me for details on multi-class pricing options. You do NOT need to be a member of Worland Health Club to attend a class there.

CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

Vinyasa Slow. Slow-Flow followed by gentle stretching. Slow-Flow involves a slow-paced flow of supine (lying down), seated, and kneeling postures, plus several standing flows and poses. These sequences aim to encourage gains in agility, coordination, strength and balance. After warming the muscles, the final portion of the class will provide gentle seated/supine stretches to improve range of motion and encourage greater flexibility. Suitable for almost any level of practitioner and almost any fitness level, so long as lying down, sitting/kneeling on the floor, and standing up from lying down/seated/kneeling do not present any issues.

Vinyasa Flow Level I. A moderately-paced, alignment-oriented Vinyasa flow class featuring an active warm-up, sun salutations, standing/balancing sequences, optional arm balances/inversions in some classes, backbends, forward bends, twists and hip openers, with attention to yogic breathing, staying present, cultivating steadiness and ease in each posture, and staying respectful of your body’s limits and edges throughout this mindful, flowing practice. Suitable for those with previous yoga experience and/or those with an established basic fitness level and a willingness/open mind toward trying something new.

Vinyasa Flow Level II. A faster-paced/more difficult alignment-oriented Vinyasa class featuring an active warm-up, sun salutations, standing/balancing sequences, optional arm balances/inversions in some classes, backbends, forward bends, twists and hip openers, with attention to yogic breathing, staying present, cultivating steadiness and ease in each posture, and staying respectful of your body’s limits and edges throughout this mindful, flowing practice. Suitable for those with previous yoga experience and/or those with an established solid fitness level and a willingness to “go with the flow” and be okay with not having as much visual guidance/demonstration of poses.

Stretch and Refresh. A slow-paced, hour-long practice featuring roughly half an hour of Yin poses followed by roughly half an hour of purely restorative poses. This class begins and concludes with a guided meditation/relaxation. Yin yoga works to gently and persistently strengthen, lengthen and nourish the body’s deeper, less elastic tissues – fascia, ligaments, joints and bones. Restorative yoga involves the use of passive poses (asanas) to help relieve stress and promote a greater sense of overall relaxation and wellbeing. Yin yoga and restorative yoga are suitable for almost anyone, so long as lying down on the ground does not pose health issues. This cooling class provides a great complement/counter-practice to the active Vinyasa flow class taking place just before it.

Worland/Ten Sleep Yoga Class Schedule October-December 2016

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Ten Sleep Yoga Classes: Monday Evenings

Session 5: October 24, 31, November 7, 14, 21, 28, December 5, 12

NOTE: Please bring your own yoga mat to yoga classes in Ten Sleep; no mats will be provided. Classes take place in the new Ten Sleep Fitness Center, where the after-school club used to be located (one block south of the school) Find class descriptions below.

Vinyasa Slow: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Vinyasa Flow Combined I & II: 5:45 to 6:45 p.m.

Drop-in fee is $8 per class; email me for details on multi-class pricing options.

Worland Yoga Classes: Wednesday Evenings

Session 5: October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14

Vinyasa Slow: 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Gottsche Wellness Center, next to the DMV and Gottsche Rehab Center in Worland. Priced according to current Gottsche rates.

Vinyasa Flow Combined I & II: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the WHC studio.

Stretch & Refresh: 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. at the WHC studio.

Drop-in fee is $8 per class at WHC; email me for details on multi-class pricing options. You do NOT need to be a member of Worland Health Club to attend a class there.

CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

Vinyasa Slow. Slow-Flow followed by gentle stretching. Slow-Flow involves a slow-paced flow of supine (lying down), seated, and kneeling postures, plus several standing flows and poses. These sequences aim to encourage gains in agility, coordination, strength and balance. After warming the muscles, the final portion of the class will provide gentle seated/supine stretches to improve range of motion and encourage greater flexibility. Suitable for almost any level of practitioner and almost any fitness level, so long as lying down, sitting/kneeling on the floor, and standing up from lying down/seated/kneeling do not present any issues.

Vinyasa Flow Level I. A moderately-paced, alignment-oriented Vinyasa flow class featuring an active warm-up, sun salutations, standing/balancing sequences, optional arm balances/inversions in some classes, backbends, forward bends, twists and hip openers, with attention to yogic breathing, staying present, cultivating steadiness and ease in each posture, and staying respectful of your body’s limits and edges throughout this mindful, flowing practice. Suitable for those with previous yoga experience and/or those with an established basic fitness level and a willingness/open mind toward trying something new.

Vinyasa Flow Level II. A faster-paced/more difficult alignment-oriented Vinyasa class featuring an active warm-up, sun salutations, standing/balancing sequences, optional arm balances/inversions in some classes, backbends, forward bends, twists and hip openers, with attention to yogic breathing, staying present, cultivating steadiness and ease in each posture, and staying respectful of your body’s limits and edges throughout this mindful, flowing practice. Suitable for those with previous yoga experience and/or those with an established solid fitness level and a willingness to “go with the flow” and be okay with not having as much visual guidance/demonstration of poses.

Stretch and Refresh. A slow-paced, hour-long practice featuring roughly half an hour of Yin poses followed by roughly half an hour of purely restorative poses. This class begins and concludes with a guided meditation/relaxation. Yin yoga works to gently and persistently strengthen, lengthen and nourish the body’s deeper, less elastic tissues – fascia, ligaments, joints and bones. Restorative yoga involves the use of passive poses (asanas) to help relieve stress and promote a greater sense of overall relaxation and wellbeing. Yin yoga and restorative yoga are suitable for almost anyone, so long as lying down on the ground does not pose health issues. This cooling class provides a great complement/counter-practice to the active Vinyasa flow class taking place just before it.

Celebrating National Yoga Month: Exploring & Enjoying the Benefits of Yoga

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Hanumanasana (Monkey Pose) with Jnana Mudra.

“Tension is who you think you should be. Relaxation is who you are.” (Chinese Proverb)

What’s your favorite yoga practice or pose?

During National Yoga Month, people all around the country celebrate yoga. According to the Yoga Health Foundation, National Yoga Month is “(a national observance designated by the Department of Health & Human Services) designed to educate about the health benefits of yoga and to inspire a healthy lifestyle.”

September focuses a spotlight on practicing yoga as a means to improve one’s health and overall wellbeing.

The two biggest reasons I hear from people about why they don’t sustain their yoga practices is that they “don’t have the time;” or that they’re “not flexible enough to do yoga.”

But both of these reasons are fantastic excuses for actually showing up to practice yoga regularly!

“I don’t have time for yoga.”

If you feel like you don’t have the time to include even 5 or 10 minutes of yoga practice in your day, it’s a great bet that you’re running on empty and overtaxed, overworked and stressed.

This situation can cause chronic damage to both your mind and your body. A yoga practice based on slowing everything down can bring tremendous stress relief (think Yin yoga or restorative yoga).

Of course, if your mind is running wild a mile-a-minute, you might find it difficult to settle into a reflective and slow-paced practice. You might find yourself drawn to a speedier, more physically demanding fast-paced practice, often called a Vinyasa flow.

This is okay, of course! If burning off some steam in a challenging class helps you relax and get out of your head, by all means you should do it — but it’s good to start balancing periods of intense activity (yoga-based or otherwise) with periods of conscious relaxation, too.

“I’m not flexible enough to do yoga.”

For the “I’m not flexible” reason for not practicing yoga, I believe that this is actually a great argument for showing up to practice. The only way I know of to increase functional flexibility is to work at it diligently and persistently.

Both fast-paced and slow-paced (and everything in between paced) yoga practices will gradually help you maintain and regain flexibility if you make them a part of your life and routine.

Benefits Beyond the Mat

Add to all of the above that practicing yoga isn’t just about regularly engaging in a series of asanas/poses to move our bodies through. It’s so much more than that!

Practicing yoga regularly helps us find a place where we both live our lives and engage in our formal practice with steadiness and ease. We learn to balance this with exploring our edges without leaping beyond them. We strive to cultivate wholeness and okay-ness within ourselves exactly as we are in this present moment and from moment to moment.

The yoga path challenges us to not just practice on the mat during a designated period of time every day or every week. With body and mind less stressed, a regular yoga practice enables us relax more easily into being who we are in each moment and into flowing along with the stream of living, complete with all of its ups and down.

In other words, we learn gradually from our formal yoga practice how to practice yoga everywhere, every day.