Tag Archives: positive thinking

When You’re “Not Feeling the Love”: Coping With Down Times in Climbing (& Other Sports)

In the spring after the rain stopped falling here, I felt pretty psyched and strong. I felt like I was climbing well. It’s always such a great feeling! I made significant progress, both in training and on routes that challenged me, had a few sends, and the summer seemed very, very promising.

However, the climbing gods had other plans for me this summer – somewhere during the heat, visitors, events, and a buildup of tweaks and twinges in my body, my psych took a hike, and I found myself more than once wondering if I even liked rock climbing any more.

This is not the first time this has happened, and I’m certain it will not be the last.

After all, 2016 marks my 24th year of climbing. Sustaining a passion for two and half decades will inevitably have its ups and downs. I feel like in a way we’re not supposed to admit that this happens, but the reality is that it does happen, to many of us.

So now, as I move from my summer doldrums back into feeling more psyched (and notably this is happening as the summer heat is starting to fade!), I put together some thoughts to share about what I’ve learned about weathering the down times. Hopefully, this will help you get through those unmotivated times that will almost inevitably strike you if you’re involved in climbing (or another sport or recreational activity) as a lifelong passion or endeavor.

  • Unless you’re injured, don’t stop training or climbing or all physical activities entirely. It will make it that much more difficult to get back into shape if and when you do feel stoked again. Oftentimes people have suggested that I “take some time off” completely, but I quickly learned long ago that starting back from being totally out of shape is not that fun. Stay active.
  • On the other hand, don’t force yourself to continue doing exactly what you’ve been doing at the same pace as you have been doing it. Burnout and loss of psych often stem from overdoing it, overtraining or accumulating fatigue. The more you force yourself to do something that is supposed to be fun but isn’t fun for you right now, the less likely you are to rediscover your fire for it anytime soon.
  • No matter what season it is (even if it’s prime climbing season where you live), consider shaking things up and redirecting your climbing focus. For me, diving into a training cycle with less climbing and more training often helps. You can also change the style of climbing you are into, if that’s an option for you (i.e. switch from sport to bouldering, or vice versa). If this doesn’t work, try this:
  • Feel free to pursue some other activities that interest you (physical or not), and spend way, way less time climbing or training for climbing. While you don’t want to “lose everything” (refer back to the first item on this list), you don’t need to continue climbing and training as much. Don’t feel guilty about it. Enjoy the break.
  • As far as climbing goes, aim for maintenance and mitigating any fitness/strength losses. Even one or two sessions a week of efficient, climbing-focused training can be enough for you to not lose much, if anything.
  • Don’t fret about where your psych went or worry that it won’t return. It will, or it won’t. Expending time and energy worrying about it and wondering why you’ve lost it doesn’t usually help. I used to get really freaked out and distressed when I felt my passion for climbing dwindle – but for me, it has always rekindled at some point. This doesn’t rule out the possibility that it won’t, but nowadays I tend to have faith that I’ll always find the love again…and if or when I don’t, then it will be time to move on.
  • Giving your whole being the time and space it needs to recover – physically, mentally and emotionally – is usually quite effective for helping recover the passion for your activity. Don’t put yourself on a timeline in terms of when you must feel ready and stoked to climb or train intensely again. Let your love for climbing guide you through the cycles of your psych and your life. Honor yourself when you need a break without any negative self-judgment.
  • View the time away from climbing as productive and helpful in the big picture. Understand that most sports have an off-season, and that giving your body (and your whole being) a break from intensive training and climbing can be helpful in healing micro-injuries or any aches and pains you might have built up. It’s okay to step away for a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months.
  • I believe one of the biggest reasons people fail at exercise programs is because they’re generally not viewed as fun or enjoyable. Rock climbing enables us to stay fit and strong while sharing our love of climbing movement and outdoor living with others. Don’t forget this! You are lucky to have found an activity that makes exercising and staying fit fun for you; handle it with the utmost care so that you don’t lose it – even if that means giving it a rest now and again.

The Fitness of Helping Others

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At one point in my past, a person told me with great disdain, “You only want to help other people because it makes you feel good about yourself.”

Think about that for a second.

What, if anything, is so inherently wrong about feeling good about yourself?

Lots of people struggle with negative feelings about themselves, much of the time. Judging oneself harshly is a common issue – finding oneself lacking and being filled with self-loathing. Many people tend to be way crueler in their own self-assessments than they would in assessing anyone else.

Getting outside of yourself by assisting others in need can help you put negative feelings and judgments about yourself in perspective. You see that you can do good works and that you have something valuable to give.

And guess what – it’s actually okay to feel good about yourself when you do this!

There are proven health benefits you’ll get from serving others, as a 2013 study reported in BMC Public Health concluded, including the following:

  • Reduced incidence of depression
  • Improved sense of overall wellbeing
  • Lowered risk of death later in life

Note that these are not direct physical fitness benefits. However, I believe that we tend to separate the mind from the body too much in our culture. Mind and body are inextricably linked, and a healthy, happy mind obviously has an impact on your quality of life and your overall fitness.

Enough about all of this “selfishness” – the personal, individual benefits YOU get from giving. Now, take a moment to think about the people (or animals, or environment) whose lives you’ll touch and help improve from your willingness to donate whatever you have to give – time, money, skills, expertise, labor, whatever – and imagine how much they can potentially benefit from your generosity.

One caveat about giving to others: Make sure you are giving freely with no expectations of a specific outcome or of getting personal recognition or gains. You are giving simply to give, free and clear.

Also, it helps if the way you choose to give resonates with you personally. For example, if you hate working with children, volunteering to work with children probably shouldn’t be you service effort of choice.

Doing something that you actually enjoy or at least don’t mind doing will put you in a more giving frame of mind, and if you come into an activity with positive energy, those around you will more likely than not pick up on it. Ditto for negative energy.

By helping others, by volunteering, by giving back in whatever way works for you, both you and others benefit. Everyone wins, and everyone involved reaps rewards. What could possibly be wrong with that equation?

Volunteer for the health and fitness benefits you will gain. Feel good about yourself when you do.

Go ahead, be selfish.