Tag Archives: Wyoming yoga

Worland/Ten Sleep Yoga Class Schedule October-December 2016

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Ten Sleep Yoga Classes: Monday Evenings

Session 5: October 24, 31, November 7, 14, 21, 28, December 5, 12

NOTE: Please bring your own yoga mat to yoga classes in Ten Sleep; no mats will be provided. Classes take place in the new Ten Sleep Fitness Center, where the after-school club used to be located (one block south of the school) Find class descriptions below.

Vinyasa Slow: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Vinyasa Flow Combined I & II: 5:45 to 6:45 p.m.

Drop-in fee is $8 per class; email me for details on multi-class pricing options.

Worland Yoga Classes: Wednesday Evenings

Session 5: October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14

Vinyasa Slow: 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Gottsche Wellness Center, next to the DMV and Gottsche Rehab Center in Worland. Priced according to current Gottsche rates.

Vinyasa Flow Combined I & II: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the WHC studio.

Stretch & Refresh: 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. at the WHC studio.

Drop-in fee is $8 per class at WHC; email me for details on multi-class pricing options. You do NOT need to be a member of Worland Health Club to attend a class there.

CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

Vinyasa Slow. Slow-Flow followed by gentle stretching. Slow-Flow involves a slow-paced flow of supine (lying down), seated, and kneeling postures, plus several standing flows and poses. These sequences aim to encourage gains in agility, coordination, strength and balance. After warming the muscles, the final portion of the class will provide gentle seated/supine stretches to improve range of motion and encourage greater flexibility. Suitable for almost any level of practitioner and almost any fitness level, so long as lying down, sitting/kneeling on the floor, and standing up from lying down/seated/kneeling do not present any issues.

Vinyasa Flow Level I. A moderately-paced, alignment-oriented Vinyasa flow class featuring an active warm-up, sun salutations, standing/balancing sequences, optional arm balances/inversions in some classes, backbends, forward bends, twists and hip openers, with attention to yogic breathing, staying present, cultivating steadiness and ease in each posture, and staying respectful of your body’s limits and edges throughout this mindful, flowing practice. Suitable for those with previous yoga experience and/or those with an established basic fitness level and a willingness/open mind toward trying something new.

Vinyasa Flow Level II. A faster-paced/more difficult alignment-oriented Vinyasa class featuring an active warm-up, sun salutations, standing/balancing sequences, optional arm balances/inversions in some classes, backbends, forward bends, twists and hip openers, with attention to yogic breathing, staying present, cultivating steadiness and ease in each posture, and staying respectful of your body’s limits and edges throughout this mindful, flowing practice. Suitable for those with previous yoga experience and/or those with an established solid fitness level and a willingness to “go with the flow” and be okay with not having as much visual guidance/demonstration of poses.

Stretch and Refresh. A slow-paced, hour-long practice featuring roughly half an hour of Yin poses followed by roughly half an hour of purely restorative poses. This class begins and concludes with a guided meditation/relaxation. Yin yoga works to gently and persistently strengthen, lengthen and nourish the body’s deeper, less elastic tissues – fascia, ligaments, joints and bones. Restorative yoga involves the use of passive poses (asanas) to help relieve stress and promote a greater sense of overall relaxation and wellbeing. Yin yoga and restorative yoga are suitable for almost anyone, so long as lying down on the ground does not pose health issues. This cooling class provides a great complement/counter-practice to the active Vinyasa flow class taking place just before it.

2016 Yoga Class Schedule, Ten Sleep & Worland, WY

Photo courtesy of Louis Arevalo

Photo courtesy of Louis Arevalo

Relax and Rejuvenate Yoga Retreat: September 9-12 at Red Reflet Ranch in Ten Sleep, Wyoming. Sign up now!

Summer Outdoor Yoga Class: Wednesday Mornings, 8 to 9 a.m.

This Vinyasa Slow yoga class takes place at Red Reflet Ranch, located south of Ten Sleep via WY 434. Dress for outdoor practice overlooking beautiful red sandstone cliffs. However, if the weather is bad, we will practice inside. Bring your yoga mat!

Session 2: August 10, 17, 24, 31, September 7, 14 (6-week session)

Ten Sleep Yoga Classes: Monday Evenings

Session 4: August 8, 15, 22, 29, September 12, 19, 26, October 3
Session 5:
October 24, 31, November 7, 14, 21, 28, December 5, 12

NOTE: You must bring your own yoga mat to yoga classes in Ten Sleep; no mats will be provided. Classes take place in a classroom at the school via the northwest door. Find class descriptions below.

Vinyasa Slow: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Vinyasa Flow Combined I & II: 5:45 to 6:45 p.m.

Drop-in fee is $8 per class; email me for details on multi-class pricing options.

Worland Yoga Classes: Wednesday Evenings

Session 4: August 10, 17, 24, 31, September 7, 14, 21, 28
Session 5:
October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14

Vinyasa Slow: 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Gottsche Wellness Center, next to the DMV and Gottsche Rehab Center in Worland. Priced according to current Gottsche rates.

Vinyasa Flow Combined I & II: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the WHC studio.

Stretch & Refresh: 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. at the at the WHC studio.

Drop-in fee is $8 per class at WHC; email me for details on multi-class pricing options. You do NOT need to be a member of Worland Health Club to attend a class there.

CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

Vinyasa Slow. Slow-Flow followed by gentle stretching. Slow-Flow involves a slow-paced flow of supine (lying down), seated, and kneeling postures, plus several standing flows and poses. These sequences aim to encourage gains in agility, coordination, strength and balance. After warming the muscles, the final portion of the class will provide gentle seated/supine stretches to improve range of motion and encourage greater flexibility. Suitable for almost any level of practitioner and almost any fitness level, so long as lying down, sitting/kneeling on the floor, and standing up from lying down/seated/kneeling do not present any issues.

Vinyasa Flow Level I. A moderately-paced, alignment-oriented Vinyasa flow class featuring an active warm-up, sun salutations, standing/balancing sequences, optional arm balances/inversions in some classes, backbends, forward bends, twists and hip openers, with attention to yogic breathing, staying present, cultivating steadiness and ease in each posture, and staying respectful of your body’s limits and edges throughout this mindful, flowing practice. Suitable for those with previous yoga experience and/or those with an established basic fitness level and a willingness/open mind toward trying something new.

Vinyasa Flow Level II. A faster-paced/more difficult alignment-oriented Vinyasa class featuring an active warm-up, sun salutations, standing/balancing sequences, optional arm balances/inversions in some classes, backbends, forward bends, twists and hip openers, with attention to yogic breathing, staying present, cultivating steadiness and ease in each posture, and staying respectful of your body’s limits and edges throughout this mindful, flowing practice. Suitable for those with previous yoga experience and/or those with an established solid fitness level and a willingness to “go with the flow” and be okay with not having as much visual guidance/demonstration of poses.

Stretch and Refresh. A slow-paced, hour-long practice featuring roughly half an hour of Yin poses followed by roughly half an hour of purely restorative poses. This class concludes with a guided meditation. Yin yoga works to gently and persistently strengthen, lengthen and nourish the body’s deeper, less elastic tissues – fascia, ligaments, joints and bones. Restorative yoga involves the use of passive poses (asanas) to help relieve stress and promote a greater sense of overall relaxation and wellbeing. Guided relaxation meditation is often included. Yin yoga and restorative yoga are suitable for almost anyone, so long as lying down on the ground does not pose health issues. This cooling class provides a great complement/counter-practice to the active Vinyasa flow class taking place just before it.

Taking a Time Out: Why You Should Make Time to Relax Part of Your Fitness Plan

20160222_132607The slow-paced practices of Yin and restorative yoga give the practitioner an opportunity to slow down and create a conscious space to take a literal time out. A time out from busy-ness, from emails and texts and social media, from screens and demands from others, and from physical activity that requires a ton of energy or muscular effort.

While it’s true that many people need to increase their levels of physical activity to optimize health and fitness, reducing stress and learning to relax could also contribute to improving health and fitness for many people, too.

Yin yoga involves stretches that are held for a few minutes at a time, aiming to increase range of motion in connective tissues (rather than muscles). People often think it’s their muscles that are tight and restricting their range of motion. This can be true, but I’d guess that at least as often, a restricted range of motion is a result of long-held structural patterns that have developed in the body over time. Yin works to gently and persistently try to encourage an improved range of motion in connective tissues that have become tight.

Restorative yoga is a passive practice of deep relaxation. The practitioner uses props such as blankets, bolsters, cushions, pillows, straps, blocks and so forth to put the body into comfortable, relaxing positions. Restorative yoga allows gravity to do the work to encourage gentle opening in certain poses. Restorative yoga creates a meditative, calming place, free from stress.

It may feel boring or like you’re not doing much when you first start out in practices like these, especially if you have a particularly busy or stressed-out mind. You may think you are wasting your time as you think about all you could get done during your time out from the rest of your life.

It can actually be much more challenging to stay focused, present, and engaged in Yin and restorative practices when compared to faster-paced physical yoga practices. The more you practice, though, the more benefits you are likely to find, as you work to calm your mind and encourage your body to relax.

My personal experience reflects this: As I’ve practiced more Yin and restorative yoga, I’ve found long-held areas of tension starting to release. I’ve consciously worked in my practice to “tell” these areas to relax, scanning my body, noticing tension, and then directing my focus to the tension and feeling it relax as I’ve learned to identify and release it.

I’ve regained a lot of mobility and range of motion in my climbing-gnarled fingers, especially – mobility I had taken for granted as gone forever. I have less delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) than ever, even though I work out harder now than ever before. I sleep better, more deeply and easily. And I am much less stressed out.

A few benefits you might experience from including a more relaxing practice in your life:

  • Reduced muscle tension, soreness, DOMS
  • Improved flexibility
  • Improved sleep
  • Better weight management/weight-loss potential
  • Improved mood and mental clarity

All of the above work together, actually. Chronic stress can mean chronically elevated cortisol levels, and elevated cortisol can keep you in a perpetual “fight-or-flight” state of being in your body. This encourages the body to prepare for emergency, which can make it want to conserve resources. In other words, it makes the body more prone to holding onto fat, and can make you hungrier as the body tries to shore itself up for the emergency situation, too.

Not enough sleep is also linked to being overweight and weight gain. Muscle tension and soreness can be direct results of stress, too, and this chronic tension and soreness reduces flexibility as well.

If you don’t think you have the time to take an hour or so out for yourself to stretch out and relax once a week, or you find it unbearable to do so, consider starting with a shorter period of time.

Try to give yourself five or even three minutes to close the door, turn off the lights, leave your phone outside, and turn your mind off, focusing just on your breathing and scanning your body for tension. If playing soft, relaxing music helps, go ahead.

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One of the most relaxing restorative poses is so simple: you just lie down next to a wall, and then swing your feet and legs up so they’re propped above your head up the wall. Your legs don’t need to be straight if that’s not comfortable for you.

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If this doesn’t work or you don’t feel relaxed in this pose, try simply lying down in a comfortable position. Your knees can be bent with the soles of your feet on the floor or mat or bed if having your legs straight doesn’t feel good.

Let your hands rest out to your sides, palms up, and try to relax your shoulder blades.

Close your eyes, soften your jaw and your face, and bring your awareness to your breath.

Scan your body consciously for areas of tension. Encourage them to release.

Relax. Let go. Be present. Enjoy.

You deserve it.

Read more: Cortisol: Why “The Stress Hormone” Is Public Enemy No. 1